Fastest Racing Drones

Fastest Racing Drones

While the evolution of drone technology has certainly created a camera/utility out of what used to be a remote controlled toy, it’s also taken that remote controlled toy to a new level of recreational usability. What we’re talking about here is drone racing. Just a decade ago, hobby enthusiasts couldn’t dream of being ‘in the cockpit’ of their RC aircraft, let alone racing said aircraft against others. Now that has become a reality. Better yet, companies are striving to simplify the hobby by manufacturing race-ready drones that require little to no assembly. When drone racing first came to light, it was staged specifically for the experienced enthusiast (still sort of is – as most pilots build/modify their drones manually). But now the sport can welcome guests of all experience levels. If you’re looking to make a start in drone racing, you’re probably wondering what the fastest drones on the market look like. Look no further.

Model Image Rating Price
Teal Drone (RTF) 9/10 Check Price
Diatone Crusader GT2 8/10 Check Price
Stigg 195 9/10 Check Price

Fastest Racing Drones

Teal Drone (RTF)

Teal Drone (RTF)

this ready-to-fly racing drone, simply put, is a beast. While this drone is in the pre-order phase, there’s already been a series of flight tests that deliver on its promises. First off, this thing can fly up to 90mph right out of the box. Add that to the hyper-intelligent mother board which basically allows for data processing, image recognition, and versatility, and you have a drone that while already impressive from the get-go can still be improved upon. It comes with an integrated 13MP camera that can record in 4k. Obviously you won’t want to use this for aerial photography (being that racing drones don’t have spectacular gimbals and are often smaller, meaning more susceptible to interference), you’re still getting a powerhouse of a camera. It transmits FPV at 720p, in HD, to either your tablet, phone, or a headset. It can withstand decent weather conditions and it’s fit to perform a slew of aerial maneuvers. It doesn’t get better than this as a beginner machine. Go check out their website too. It’s impressive.
Diatone Crusader GT2

Diatone Crusader GT2

for starters, this isn’t RTF right out of the box, but it doesn’t require any ‘complex’ assembly either. This particular drone comes in three different sizes and can hit speeds above 90mph (this has all been verified). It’s certainly a racing drone, but an interesting part of the build is that you can also attach a GoPro hero and capture footage in 4k. The somewhat assembled GT2 comes with a flight controller, a control board, rotors, a 700TVL SONY camera (you’ll see these a lot on this caliber of drone), a video transmitter and props. To have this up and running as an FPV racer you’ll need to buy a 3-4s battery, battery charger, receiver, transmitter (radio), FPV receiver module, then something to stream FPV to (most likely a headset, if you’re going to be racing). What makes the Crusader GT2 such a favorite, is that all you have to do is snap these parts in and get to racing. On the user’s end, there’s no calibration or soldering involved, making it a much simpler assembly than some of the other racing drones in the market. Making it possible to, after a bit of research, assemble the drone on your own despite your skill level. Not to mention the Crusader GT2 is one of the fastest racing drones available, and it’s not even a ‘build-it-yourself’ model.
Stigg 195

Stigg 195

this Catalyst Machineworks drone was catalogued at 128mph. Yes, you read that right, 128mph. By no means is this a beginner or inexperienced enthusiast’s drone, rather it’s an absolute alpha in the drone racing community. Despite what you’ll find in your research, the common consensus is that this is the fastest drone ever recorded (and it’s true to its reputation, as this very drone has one a few drone racing competitions in Austrlia). It’s sold as nothing but a barebones chassis and needs everything from rotors, power board, FPV system, camera, battery, and more. Of course, we’re talking about a ground-up build so soldering and a thorough understanding of drone tech is necessary for this machine to be a feasible option. Why is it faster? It has everything to do with the design of the chassis, as the engineers sought the perfect configuration to manufacture the best NET thrust to weight ratio the racing community has seen.

There you have it. From a racing drone that can fly up to 90mph right out of the box, to a drone that can fly above over that speed once properly assembled, to a drone that requires complete self-assembly that can probably fly faster than your car at its maximum speed. Although the best racing drones are vast and complex, the more the technology continues to evolve, the more centralized the sport is going to become.

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